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Discussion Starter #1
On my 12R the front braided brake lines come straight from the MC to the calipers, and are attached to the MC using one long banjo bolt. I have it all apart as one line was about 10" too long, and I am going to clean and rebuild the calipers.
Is it better for any reason to have the one-line-into-a-tee design, the one from the factory?
 

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No, 2 lines are cheaper to buy ( aftermarket ) and just as efficient as the original 3 line system.

I think the original brake lines are swaged onto the 1 to 2 line splitter, so you would have to buy an aftermarket splitter as well if you wanted to stay with the original set-up.
 

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Is it better for any reason to have the one-line-into-a-tee design, the one from the factory?
I'm guessing it was the best way to control the movement of the brake lines in such a tightly-spaced, constantly moving environment. Zip-tied brake lines wouldn't be a production option...:scared:
 

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And the original option is cheap!
Several bikes still come with a single line to one calliper and a daisy chain over the wheel to the other. Cheap.
Many (most if not all) Japanese bikes still ship with rubber brake lines. Cheap.

European manufactured bikes nearly always come with stainless, braided lines as standard.
 

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If you send the original brake line to Galfer they will reproduce it for you. The only difference will be that the splitter will not have the bolt hole in it so you will need to zip tie it in place. Its worked out satisfactorily for me as I didn't want the daisy-chain look over my fender.
 

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T = Master line is stationary, does not move when sitting at that 3-point junction at the lower fork stem.

Dualines = They will float up and down ~ Stressing the banjo bolt. The longer the line, the less flex to the banjo. You need to make a guideye so both lines rub up and down on something that won't wear out the line is float it in the center of the guide with rubber 0-rings. Something like that.

Calipersquiding = Never take sand paper to a caliper's wall. It is a machined fit and you now wiggle the piston taking out material. Wadever you wipe across your ass is what you wipe the caliper out wit. Unless you use sandpaper after you know, squat.

Calipersalt = WATT [heat] displaces oil you send it bubbling? That's right, water is in that bubble. She now drops to the bottom because water is heavier than oil. It begins the rotting process of the metal. Stay lag tight, or say lag might, you stand in the middle of that o-ring, look up, look down, you see that displace the oil?

That whiteshit then places pressure onto the quad-ring; the ring now bites into the piston; the piston then locks to where it is; the oil release from the back still works; the quad no longer can move back to square; the whiteshit is stopping the ring to pull back the piston upon release; the pad drags; the disc gets hot; the heat begins to warp and boil parts.

Caliper Square Groove = The key to the rebuild is to eliminate the sulfation in the groove. Brake clean, a dentist pick, paper towels, and the sun is your work station. When the brake clean evaps, this exposes what the pick did not clean, you angle that grove in the sun's rays. The sun brings out that white powder as to where you missed with the pick. It's that little bit that locks the ring up against the piston. Make sense?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Good deal Hubz. Now you're yer normal self, thank you, I was beginning to worry mate. I understood it all, thank God I know how the caliper works, how its cleaned and can decypher what you are saying I think ;)
Not sure though sulfation applies, it ain't a battery you know. I could hook up a de-sulfator to it though. I will clean out all other contamination, like crusting and dirt <rolls eyes>
I think I will not worry about stressing out the banjo bolt. It is a 10 mm thread, shear strength of about 1 ton, I don't think I am likely to cause any problems for it from the 6 mm flexible hose moving up and down 2 inches with suspension motion. Maybe I am becoming less anal than before but even I won't worry about that. Zip tie perhaps. I will go with aircraft approved Teflon one ;)
 
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