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here is my ?
when pulled over should I keep helmet on or take it off?
I was pulled over last week ( zx12 w/fender eliminator) Mass. state police. officer followed me for a bit ,I was in middle lane of highway following a few cars going 65 , I saw him in left lane just behind me . I thought not again this had to be the 6th, to 8th time in the last year a officer has followed me. Blue lights go on , thats a first all others follow then disappiar. So I pulled over sat there and he came up and asked for license & reg. I said it's under my seat . got off bike and got them out , I asked if I had done something wrong , He said my license plate was at to steep of an angle and it must be straight up and down. I told him this is how i bought it at the dealership. he went to cruiser , came back a minute later said he had an important call for me to fix plate and left.( I wonder if my being old enough to be his father had anything to do with no ticket)I wanted to ask him about helmet but he left in a hurry.Don't know why plate was OK for all other officers but I made a new bracket for plate anyway.
 

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I'll chime-in, but this response is not from a LEO, so take it FWIW...

I have been told that when you are pulled over on 2 wheels, you are to:

1) Pull off roadway onto shoulder to a safe place & stop.
2) Remain seated on bike, kickstand down.
3) Keep both hands in clear view, & make no furtive movement.
4) Respond to LEO's requests as directly & accurately as possible.
5) If retrieving your documentation requires dismounting and/or opening storage, inform LEO before moving to do so.

So, keeping the above in mind, I have always kept my helmet on during stops... Sometimes LEOs will ask me to remove it (Most times not...), & I comply... I am always as courteous as the situation allows, & I find that this is (usually) reciprocated...

While this all may seem a bit Draconian, it is more easily understood (for me, anyway) when viewed from the LEO's perspective: When pulling a vehicle, he has no idea what awaits, & he will necessarily be extra cautious/suspicious until he can evaluate his stop... His training requires that he consider all possible threats as a part of this routine...

In the end, it is the safest method for both involved parties (& bystanders)...

Just my $.02... :squint::squint:
 

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I'll chime-in, but this response is not from a LEO, so take it FWIW...

I have been told that when you are pulled over on 2 wheels, you are to:

1) Pull off roadway onto shoulder to a safe place & stop.
2) Remain seated on bike, kickstand down.
3) Keep both hands in clear view, & make no furtive movement.
4) Respond to LEO's requests as directly & accurately as possible.
5) If retrieving your documentation requires dismounting and/or opening storage, inform LEO before moving to do so.

So, keeping the above in mind, I have always kept my helmet on during stops... Sometimes LEOs will ask me to remove it (Most times not...), & I comply... I am always as courteous as the situation allows, & I find that this is (usually) reciprocated...

While this all may seem a bit Draconian, it is more easily understood (for me, anyway) when viewed from the LEO's perspective: When pulling a vehicle, he has no idea what awaits, & he will necessarily be extra cautious/suspicious until he can evaluate his stop... His training requires that he consider all possible threats as a part of this routine...

In the end, it is the safest method for both involved parties (& bystanders)...

Just my $.02...
Bang on with your procedure, other then to add one thing; once your pulled over and stopped, shut the bike off. Two reasons:

1) The exhaust sound can make it hard for you to hear anything being said to you (since the helmet already causes muffling).

2) It drops the anxiety level of the officer in respect to any thoughts that you may run.

One of the only reasons you'll be asked to take the helmet off is for identity confirmation, so smile, visor up, and be polite. You'd be surprised how much you can get away with, especially since most cops have some gear head in them, and almost all own a bike of some kind.

Cheers,


Chris
 

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I don't get it. You were on a ZX-12 and you pulled over? Still don't get it.
 

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In my case...pulled over as LEO had a call about someone doing wheelies on the highway. As LEO was approaching, I removed my helmet. As soon as he saw me, he stated the "wheelie" report, told me to be safe and have a nice day. No license check or anything. I guess he thought this old man couldn't do a wheelie. Insulted, I went on my way ( I should have left the scene on the back wheel), and stopped by Wally World to get some Just For Men hair color :)
 

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unless they are tackling me off the bike, i tend to follow Go's procedure except that i always take my helmet and gloves off prior to them stepping out of the car.
 

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polite and curteous, whether I'm on the bike or in the car. I also speak slower with a little twang(Think "Yesssir, NoSirrr.), redneck cops appreciate a good ole' boy.

The last cop that pulled me over for my plate not being verticle....I gotta find the link....

I wanted to BEAT HIS ASS....and once he stepped over the line...I reported him to the local precinct. Prolly did nothing, but I enjoyed yelling at his boss.
 

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Couldn't find the link to my last run-in...

Cop pulls me over in the middle of a 4 way intersection and jumps out yelling at me and threatening me. I used Go's procedure to calm thing down a bit...

He continued talking shitty to me and told me "You better be glad you dind't run or I woulda put you off the road." Said that shit like 5 times...he was angry as hell. I thought he was going to draw on me....So, by the time he wanted to see my license and insurance, I replied "I've been in the Army for 20 years, I don't fucking run from anyone." After he figured out that I was not one of the young guns that likes playing with him, he told me to fix the plate and told me to take off. I got his name and reported the incident to his shift supervisor.

Moral of the story....escelation is always an option that we can diffuse. I'm sure there are exceptions to the rule, but being cool and calm got me a lot further than anything else I woulda done at that moment.

I wanted to beat his little ass sensless for being such a prick, and for having the stupid misconception that his souped up camero could actually get close enough to me to put me off the road.

I thank goodness that cops like this fool are few and far between from my personal experience.
 

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Couldn't find the link to my last run-in...

Cop pulls me over in the middle of a 4 way intersection and jumps out yelling at me and threatening me. I used Go's procedure to calm thing down a bit...

He continued talking shitty to me and told me "You better be glad you dind't run or I woulda put you off the road." Said that shit like 5 times...he was angry as hell. I thought he was going to draw on me....So, by the time he wanted to see my license and insurance, I replied "I've been in the Army for 20 years, I don't fucking run from anyone." After he figured out that I was not one of the young guns that likes playing with him, he told me to fix the plate and told me to take off. I got his name and reported the incident to his shift supervisor.

Moral of the story....escelation is always an option that we can diffuse. I'm sure there are exceptions to the rule, but being cool and calm got me a lot further than anything else I woulda done at that moment.

I wanted to beat his little ass sensless for being such a prick, and for having the stupid misconception that his souped up camero could actually get close enough to me to put me off the road.

I thank goodness that cops like this fool are few and far between from my personal experience.
Speaking as a LEO, I am sorry you had this experience. I am, however, pleased that this incident didn't sour your opinion of all of us. I ask that you please report incidents like this when they happen. Ask to see the supervisor. Most jurisdictions have one on duty all the time or can provide you with a complaint line to call. Chances are, you are not the first to have a bad experience with this officer. Trust me, enough complaints will at least get officers like that investigated. Good officers really dislike officers like that because they give us a bad name.
 
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