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Discussion Starter #1
Howdy,

I'm about to start the install on my new Kevlar lines and am looking for any feedback or advice on the install process....just in case.

IE Anything to look out for, be careful of etc... :roll:

And is DOT 5 really that much better????

Thanks in advance,

Chris
 

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1)DON"T get that shit on your paint!!!!
2)try not to let air get in the caliper

Pump the new lines full before attaching them to the calipers.
 

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Mock the lines up before you try to bolt them on. U may have to turn the banjo fitting a little for it to fit flush against the master cylinder and brake caliper. Its not a big deal to do. U can lightly clamp it and take a screwdriver thru the hole in the banjo fitting to twist it on the end of the line. U can only twist one direction, so if U go to far do back it around, take it all the way around again. It should explain on the package. I had to twist my just a little bit to get the to fit nice and flush. Also make sure your brake lever is adjust as far out as possible so it will get a good bite when you start to bleed them.
 
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You may find it easier when it comes to bleeding the lines to have two people for the job. Makes life easier.
 

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some say the kevlar gets weathered quicker and stays dirty lookin.

kevlar is lighter

i've heard about more leak problems from kevlar

feel is supposed to be pretty close with kevlar maybe a tiny bit more crisp, most probably wouldnt notice the difference

i personally like the look and feel of my clear covered stainless better than the kevlar stuff i checked out

both lightyears better than original rubber balloon hose

$.03 :shock:
 

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When I replaced the brake lines on my ZX7 with stainless, I pumped all the fluid out first.
Fitted the new lines, then got a big syringe from the local vet, hooked the bleed line up to this, then filled the system by sucking it through from the calipers, using the syringe.
You may want to finish off with a quick bleed just to make sure all the air is removed from the system.
Sucking the fluid through from the bottom should elimate this.
Doing it this way worked for me, the whole job took about one hour. 8)
 

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Castor,
I've replaced all my brake lines with Goodridge Kevlar with swaged end fittings. The swaged fittings allow you to rotate the ends to fit perfectly without having to resort to twisting the end fittings as per normal nut and bolt ends.
They are more flexible than standard Goodridge and easier to install.
I use DOT 5 fully synthetic brake fluid as it doesn't damage paintwork and it doesn't absorb moisture like mineral fluids. (This means that you don't have to throw out the unused fluid after you open the can.
I have had no problems at all with these lines and I have installed several sets on other bikes.
I have attached a few photo's for you to look at to see how they look, I went for the understated Bleck lines with stainless fittings. they are available in just about any combination you want.
Front Master cylinder pic, note that I only used 2 lines (instead of 3) and that there are no nuts or bolts as th ends merely swivel.



Lower yoke fittingd, Note the use of P clips to attach the lines to the yoke (triple clamp) and I have used 2 clips to keep the lines in check. You can see the bends that you can put on them, they will bend even more if you wish, but I thought a nice radius would suffice.



Front caliper end fitting.




Rear master cylinder fitting with normal goodridge reservoir pipe.



Hope the pics come out and this info helps you out. Between the Kevlar lines, Dot 5 Full synthetic and HH pads, the brakes are pretty wild to say the least. After spending a few days sliding about with the wheels locked up, I have now gotten the hang of them, wouldn't swap them for anything.
PS, the Gilles rearsets improve the rear brake no end by virtue of an increased leverage ratio.
Regards
Ted
 

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most good kits come with the front combiner. like ted shows

the modulation is awesome once you get the feel for it!!!!!

ps: i don't really know shit. just my experience. :p
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the great advice so far...

Ted, those two red anodized clips you used.....did you fabricate them yourself or buy them - just wondering as they look pretty damn trick! (The P clips are straight forward)

My set has the two line / combiner setup, so no real problems there.

Did anyone remove the original line splitter at the yoke or is it fixed?? A buddy with a 929 removed his when he switched to Kevlar lines...and I really havent taken a hard look there yet on the 12... :roll:

Thanks in advance,

Chris
 

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Banjo Bolts and Crush Washers

Looking at the photos that Ted posted, there are two crush washers between the banjos. Crush washers provide a seal between the metal surfaces. If you look closely at a used crush washer, you'll see an indentation with edges on both sides where the smaller diameter banjo bites into the soft washer.

That's why it's usually a bad idea to re-use crush washers. They're no longer flat and when you "re-crush" them, you won't usually get as good a seal as you did the first time. In fact, if the banjo crosses one of the prior "edges" you'll get a downright crappy seal.

In the pic that Ted posted, there are two crush washers together. This adds an additional seal between the two washers, but instead of biting into each other, they are two flat surfaces trying to seal against each other without a gasket.

On a double banjo bolt, there should be three crush washers.
 

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Castor,
The anodised red clips are store bought. Again you can get them in any colour going.
The crush washers come with the kits, I've always used 4 washers per double banjo bolt and never to date had a leak, but I've also seen plenty of 3 washer set ups that work equally as well. I think it is six of one and half a dozen of the other.
The comment about the banjo biting into the copper washers makes sense as well.
I too will always use new crush washers every time, that is good sound advice from JMBrenner.
Whether to use 3 or 4 washers, I think it is a personal choice.
Regards
Ted
 

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Vozizm,
Regarding which type of brake line lasts longer, I haven't got a clue! I've never had any problems with stainless in the past, providing that you use stainles banjo's.
I've only started fitting Kevlar lines over the last 12 months, again with no problems to date. Anyone else help out?
Regards
Ted
 

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Me neither, I would like to see them as well. If you removed them, can you leave them up long enough for us to enter your post into the award draw?

Thanks
 

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Easy,
Just in case this doesn't work, I've sent you a copy of the pics. The front view is slightly different but, the description is the same.
I will try to post the pics with this post and see what happens. I couldn't get them to show either, i have them with MSN, maybe it is something that they are doing? I don't know. Anyway, here goes!

Master cylinder view,



Front view, lower yoke.



Caliper view,



Hope these come out and stay!
Regards
Ted






Regards
Ted
 
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