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Two of which I owned:

1969 Honda CB750 (Arguably, the bike that started the superbike wars); and
1979 Honda CBX (No explanation required, I maintain)

One that I now own its great great great,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, grandson:

1975 Honda GL1000
 

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77' Yamaha XS750 Triple Not really that fast but it was fast enough, and with front and rear disc brakes.

77' Kawasaki KZ1000 This was the bike all of us lusted after when I was in High School, I finally got one when I was 27.....
 

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What was the first, fully-faired Japanese bike? Furthest back I can remember is the Hurricane or Interceptor.
 

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just restored 1987 rd350 ypvs 9k miles 2 owners me and brother in law. had a blade as well, got this bike to thank for having a 12 now.
 

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I'll go with Mark on the 1969 750 Honda, BUT the 1972 H2 750 Kawasaki set the mark for power.. Next up was the 1973 Z1 900, 1977 seen the GS1000 Suzuki.. The NEXT HUGE LEAP was the 1980 GS1100 Suzuki with the TSCC 4 valve head.. Kawasaki stepped up in 1983 with the GPz1100 which was the first stock bike in the 10s. From here it gets unreal with the GSXR line and the Yami R1.. Kawasaki struggled until 1990 with the ZX1100.. Which ruled everything until the Busa.

Sorry Mark but the CBX was never a match for the Z1,,, The CBX has a hell of a 1st and 2nd gear but faded fast in third and the Z1 kept on going...
 

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70's, well that would be this..... Kawasaki 750 triple. Scary beast. I have a buddy that has a lightly modified triple that runs mid 9's all day in the 1/4 mi.



80's..my vote goes to the Suzuki GS1150. There was nothing that could keep up with them in a straight line for a few years. The one pictured below is nearly identical to the one I used to own.



The 90's...my vote goes to the '97 SRAD GSX-R750 (still my favorite bike of all time). It reset the standards of what a sportbike should be.

 

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The GSXR was the first true full fairing production race bike-but the hurricane 1000 was a great bike. I just thought it was ugly- but I still owned a black and red one.
 

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I'd have to give the nod to my '86 Honda VFR-750R Interceptor.

It was probably the best overall bike I've ever owned and the first bike I did a 50 MPH power wheelie on. Bought it new, told Harley-Davidson to suck my TARIFF and... The rest is history.

I know today that is blase~ but back in the day that was the shit.
 

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H2 750 Kaw triple for pure madness. Kz 900 for inovation (DOHC). Z1R for first under 12 QTR. 84 900 Ninja for first street superbike and ZX1100 for longest running top end bike.
 

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Not to thread jack and hopfully not a repost but i forgot about the tripple 2 stroke Kawasaki's. How about this beast?



We've seen power output from the Japanese fours plateau around the 150-hp mark (at the rear wheel on a dyno) for a few years now, and the OEMs seem to be focusing more on rideability rather than the exponential increases in torque and horsepower we've grown accustomed to over the last three decades. If they can make 220 hp MotoGP bikes, they can make them for us. If they wanted to.

Stephen Rothwell of The Two Stroke Shop, located in Tropical North Queensland, Australia, decided to tackle this crisis by using tried-and-true technology: the two-stroke engine. Rothwell had heard enough of legendary two-strokes like the Yamaha TZ750, so he decided to build his own legend. Rothwell and partner Wayne Wright (who designed two-stroke motors for GP race teams in New Zealand) were already building complete top-end kits for Yamaha two-stroke motors, so they already had some of the parts and the know-how for such a project.What the world needed was an answer to the current literbikes, which we find anemic," Rothwell told me over the phone. "If a bike can't hoist the wheel in 4th gear off the throttle it's not a superbike." The 1100cc three-cylinder TSS1100GP should have no such problems; when completed, it should make 250 hp at the rear wheel and 160 ft.-lbs. of torque. A powervalve will keep things rideable, with a characteristic hit of power as the revs climb. The chassis will be a lightly-modded Kawasaki ZX-10R ("it's beefy enough") and Rothwell expects the wet weight to be under 340 pounds: "when you dismantle a literbike and see how heavy that four-stroke motor is, it's just sad, really." The next project? The 112-hp TSS500 engine installed in a Yamaha WR450 supermoto chassis. "There's nothing 'super' about a four-stroke supermoto," sniffed Rothwell.Not crazy enough? Rothwell and Wright can build you a 2200cc four-cylinder that could pump out 500 bhp and 300 ft.-lbs. of torque (add 10% if you want to run alcohol), although he admits that would be "far too much for a motorcycle, even by our standards." But the goal of TSS isn't to crank out demented one-off specials for wealthy lunatics. Rather, it's to bring attention to the efficient, powerful, and even environmentally friendly (Rothwell says these engines could be Euro3 and CARB compliant with the use of direct-injection technology) potential of two-stroke motors. The hope is that the Japanese factories will return to the smokey, wheelie-ing ways of their youth (minus the smoke) and build light, fast and durable motorcycles that can scare the crap out of us.


 

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I've done some stupid stuff, but...

Top five for me would be the 78' Z1R,83' gsx 1100s Katana,86' Gsxr 750(my first bike btw),96' Gsxr 750 again, 98' R1.
No shit buddy, I owned a '78 Z1R that had 5,2XX original miles on it when I sold it.

I bought it from a Doctor here in town that was the original owner and it had just 3,100 miles on the ticker when I bought it. All documented to the T.

It sat in the original owners garage for almost two years because he couldn't register it.

He purchased it from a Kawasaki dealer in Aurora, CO. called Sportsland that unbeknownst to him (and a lot of others including the Aurora Police Department) was in serious financial trouble.

The owners (names were Valentine) sold tens of thousands of dollars in bikes without ever paying off their bank and then skipped town leaving the bank and owners in limbo.

The bank wanted the bikes back to sell to paydown the losses and guys like the doctor that paid cash were stuck in the middle.

Long story short the doctor was NOT giving back a bike he paid hard cash for and the bank was NOT going to give him title so after the two temps ran out it was illegal to drive in Colorado.

Two years later the surety company finally paid up and he got his title. True story.

So fast forward to 1999. I really didn't do much with the bike except take it out a couple times a year and I got a letter from a company down in Texas that found me through DMV records.

They buy rare and vintage Japanese bikes, restore them to as-new condition and then sell them for big $$$$$.

They made me an offer that I couldn't (at the time) refuse.

The owner told me that they had an order for the bike from some rich dude in Japan and after a full restoration that was where the bike was headed.

Worst mistake I ever made selling that bike. Well, second worst. The first was not buying an original 1969 Road Runner 440/6 for $10K back in 1990 from the original owner in Nebraska but thats another story and one I am sure he regrets far worse than I do the Z1R...
 
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