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1. Take jeweler's flat file, lower the nicks but do not scratch the tube's chrome finish. This happens from the pores being big enough for water to get in behind the finish and push it out via rust.

2. The easiest cir-clip tool would be the c-clip kind of angle are the L tips to remove the c-ring from the fork leg. Also, note how the clip came out. The flat or cut side faces you. That's so the cut digs into the machined cut, not the round side that could pop out under 'thrust,' being the one side is called when there is that kind of pressure on the assembly.

3. With a round screwdriver shaft, a stone grinding wheel, you spin the old fork seal's rubber down. Use your hands keeping the seal squared and spinning on the shaft: to the point of dropping the seal back down into the fork leg. This now becomes your seal installer.

4, With a plastic sandwich bag, you cut out enough baggie to run over the top of the leg so you do not take a chance cutting the new lip of the new seal. Look for any baggie plastic that got caught in the lip or any part of the seal before you send it home in the fork leg. Packing the seal with grease is an option. I prefer dry.

5. With a cut of length of pvc water pipe, the diameter [past] over the leg; the tube is going to pound on top of the old seal; the old seal is going to pound in the new seal = In a straight shot. So push the new seal in by hand, making sure its sits even and square is to set the new seal in place before you bang it home with the pvc pipe. Slip the washer and c-clip over and if it's not in the groove, use the old seal and pvc to bang over the c-clip to send it in the groove... Fill with fluid, etc.
 

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It's best to loosen the top cap when the forks are fitted to the yokes, then remove the fork, undo the top cap completely and drain out the oil.

There's an Allen bolt at the bottom of the forks that holds the whole thing together, undo the bolt (an impact gun is good for this) and the fork lower part can be drawn straight out, the dust seal and wire C clip removed and seal prised out and replaced.


Re-assemble and fill with the correct grade of oil and refit.

Follow Hubz instructions if you like, but he obviously hasn't replaced a set of fork seals on a 12 before.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It's best to loosen the top cap when the forks are fitted to the yokes, then remove the fork, undo the top cap completely and drain out the oil.

There's an Allen bolt at the bottom of the forks that holds the whole thing together, undo the bolt (an impact gun is good for this) and the fork lower part can be drawn straight out, the dust seal and wire C clip removed and seal prised out and replaced.


Re-assemble and fill with the correct grade of oil and refit.

Follow Hubz instructions if you like, but he obviously hasn't replaced a set of fork seals on a 12 before.
When you say yokes, you mean triples, correct?
 

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There's an Allen bolt at the bottom of the forks that holds the whole thing together, undo the bolt (an impact gun is good for this)...

...but he obviously hasn't replaced a set of fork seals on a 12 before.
Page 12-11 in the 00-01 12 shop manual. This ring is the e-ring, so no special tools for this but a pocket flat blade screwdriver to pry up the dust seal and then hook the e-ring at the bend to pop it out.

If you don't follow creed's move, have and unworn hex head, the air power behind it, you'll tear out the hex head without using lots of shock at it. Pressure using an L angle by hand, is that you never can remain at a 90 degree. So those few degrees off center, it can pop you out of the hole. With 100 psi, a straight shot down at the bolt, the rat-tat-tat of the shock release... Good luck any other way!

And then there is the cleaning of that bolt and thread hole. This is so you can apply kawibond, or yamabond to the clean dry threads of the hex. The crush washer should be changed, but that may be jammed in the fork leg, sometimes. Or you rather not change it? Either way, the bond is still the loophole with either a new or old crush washer.

With this style fork seal, this is where you protect the leg on one side of the prying out of that seal. Use a really hard wood like they use for steel and brass brushes? You lay that stick across the one end of the fork leg, lay a pry bar under the seal, and lay the pry on top of the wooden handle. I find the seal is better coming out as one [stationary] yank, rather than short jabs around and under the seal.

Yes, I've done plenty of this type seal design on removal/install. Still universal installing a seal in the cheap seats, or buy a [one time use] 60 to 80 dollar seal installer.

Zeus said:
So there is no need to pull the forks off to swap fork seals?
Yes and no.

Yes... you can drop the tube, pull the fork seal out from the bottom of the leg, install the seal by hammering the seal back in upside down.

Yes... you can use a big dollar seal installer to install the seal, because the seal tool splits in half.

No... you could not do this in the cheap seats with a long water pcv pipe that fits over the fork tube and narrow enough to fit over the seal to pound it in.
 

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So there is no need to pull the forks off to swap fork seals?

The Fescalised portion (shiny part) of the lower fork leg is approx the same length as the gold upper part of the fork (about 18 inches long) so in theory, you could remove the fork lower without removing the fork from the bike, but you may have to raise the front of the bike a few inches and, when the lower comes free, you'll get fork oil everywhere., for the sake of the 3 bolts that secure the fork to the yoke (triples), if it was me, I'd remove them before dis-assembly.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
They are already off the bike. I just want to change the seals, the easiest way possible. The manual shows high dollar tools which I'm not going to buy since they won't be used often enough.
 

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Did you ever have a problem with the Allen bolt spinning and not tightening at assembly time?
How did you go about tightening the Allen bolt without torquing it to too much torque with the impact gun?
 

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Did you ever have a problem with the Allen bolt spinning and not tightening at assembly time?
How did you go about tightening the Allen bolt without torquing it to too much torque with the impact gun?

Sometimes the damper will spin when you undo the Allen bolt, but with either a Battery drill or a pneumatic gun, the Allen bolt normally spins out, if it doesn't you can compress the fork to put some force on the damper to hold it and the bolt should then come out.

You don't do the Allen bolt up with a gun, just an Allen key/bit driver and torque wrench (if you feel the need)
 
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